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Frozen moments from the infinity that is time


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Higashiyama Whimsey (Kyoto)

Higashiyama is one of the eleven wards that comprise the city of Kyoto and is well known for its examples of old Japanese architecture and for a number of significant historic sites within the ward.

I have covered many of these historic sites in previous posts and today I would like to share images of a more whimsical everyday nature. Whilst I will be forever impressed by Kyoto’s better known sites, I also enjoyed my walks between these sites and took many photos to remind me of the little joys of walking around the Higashiyama precinct.

I will restrict my comments to brief mentions of the Tokei-ji Temple (pic 14) and the Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine (pic 15). Tokei-ji is a small temple that dates back to the mid 18th century, which was transferred to its present site in 1860. Also known as Akiba-san (after the main object of worship), the temple is seen as a guardian against fire-related calamities and robbery, as well as for safety at home.

The Wakamiya Hachimangu Shrine was established in 1053, with the main deities enshrined being the Emperor Ojin and his parents, Emperor Chuai and Empress Jingu. The shrine was moved several times before settling at the present site in 1605, with the present shrine buildings dating back to 1654. A four-day pottery festival is held from August 7th through 10th each year in commemoration of the deity of pottery (Shiinetsuhikonomikoto) who was enshrined here in 1949.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)

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2014 Favourites

As 2014 draws to an end, it is natural to become somewhat reflective and for my final blog for this year, I thought I would select my favourite shot from each month’s posts.

This was more difficult than I had thought. Each photo is a memory and some months had several favourites. However, changing the rules on New Year’s Eve does not bode well for 2015 resolutions, so I stuck to the task and made my selections.

There is no theme. They are simply my selections for a variety of reasons and no further commentary will be made, except to say they are shown in chronological order (January to December) should anyone wish to visit the original posts.

I would like to thank everyone who has supported my blog this year and I hope the photos and stories have brought you as much pleasure as they have brought me.

I wish you all a safe and happy New Year and my best wishes for the year ahead.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)


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Kennin-ji Temple

Being located in Kyoto’s Higashiyama district and close to Gion, the Kennin-ji Temple is easily accessible if visiting Kyoto. Unfortunately, much of the temple was closed for renovation and refurbishment during my visit, thus I am able to present merely a glimpse of the temple’s range and splendour.

The temple is historically significant as not only one of the Kyoto Gozan (five most important Zen temples of Kyoto), but as Kyoto’s oldest Zen temple founded in 1202. The founding monk (Eisai) is credited with introducing Zen to Japan and is buried within the temple grounds.

Pic 1, somewhat playfully titled “Contemplation”, hints at the temple’s meditative qualities. I say playfully titled because the shot took me at least thirty minutes to capture due to other visitors wandering into and lingering within the frame. Perhaps next year I will start a “ban selfies” movement :). Sadly the light deteriorated over this period, but one must acknowledge that all visitors have equal rights no matter how frustrating it can be when all one wants is a fraction of a second of clear space. Okay, I finally have that off my chest.

The most dominant feature of the main hall is also the newest, namely the Twin Dragons (pics 1 to 4) that look down from above. The work was installed in 2002 to commemorate Kennin-ji’s 800-year anniversary after taking the artist almost two years to complete. Created offsite, the work’s scale is imposing and is equivalent to the size of 108 tatami mats.

Other fine examples of Japanese art may be seen in the study rooms (pics 8 to 11) where various themes and traditional stories are represented in visual form.

Finally, I would have liked to show images from across Kennin-ji’s gardens, but I had access only to Chouontei – the garden of the sound of the tide. As one can observe from pic 12, Chouontei is indeed a relaxing place to spend some quiet reflective time outdoors.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)