johnliddlephotography

Frozen moments from the infinity that is time

Everyday Tokyo

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This is my hundredth post on Japan, thus bringing this series to an end, at least until I can return to build a larger image stock. I am, however, intending to finish the year with a couple of posts based on specific individual images to ease my withdrawal symptoms. The images I have shared over this journey were taken during two separate six-week visits during the Japanese Autumn and Spring seasons, with the approach evolving as I went. From my perspective I have enjoyed the experience, which allowed me to stay in touch with Japan and to gain enhanced knowledge through comments made on photographs from time to time.

Whilst this is really a low-key finale I thought it fitting to finish with a few street shots of everyday life from the world’s most populated metropolis. The opening image (pic 1) was clearly shot in the Ginza where upmarket brands compete for attention and seem to be regarded as commonplace by local Tokyoites. Of course, I’m sure the subliminal messaging is still working. From the Ginza to the older Tokyo vibe of Asakusa (pic 2) is a big change, but kids are kids and I thought the teacher (my assumption) setting-up for a group shot to remember the outing was quite universal in its nature.

Pics 3 and 4 taken on a Sunday visit to Ueno Park are reminders of the contrasts to be found in all societies. Whilst the bike-riding drummer (pic 3) attracted a crowd, almost directly across the pathway was the homeless person (pic 4) alone with her thoughts. During my times in Tokyo I visited Ebisu often for the convenience of shopping (pic 5), as well as being a frequent visitor to Tokyo’s wonderful Museum of Photography (pic 6).

I’ve included three shots from Hibiya (pics 7 to 9) as I believe the area highlights two commendable characteristics of Tokyo life. For an area that in many other cities around the world might tend towards seediness, the pictures demonstrate the typical cleanliness of the streets and the high level of public safety.

This brings me to the final shot taken in Roppongi. Compared to the ordered chaos of the famous Shibuya crossing, the street crossing in Roppongi (pic 10) is humdrum. Nevertheless, I found it an interesting example of proxemic behaviour where those waiting to cross have each taken up positions that maximises their personal space. The classic example of such behaviour is most easily observed in elevators. Be observant next time you ride a lift.

Thank you to everyone who has visited my blog, with an especial thanks to those who have been regular visitors since the early stages of this series.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)

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This gallery contains 10 photos


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Hibiya

Watching a place come to life is always interesting and so it was one chilly December evening in Hibiya. Visiting Hibiya was accidental and just happened to be the place I ended up after wandering around the streets of central Tokyo for most of my day. It turned out to be a fortunate accident given that my wanderings to that point had not yielded much in photographic terms. Feeling a bit weary and in need of a coffee I came across a café with a window bench and settled in to relax a while and do some people watching.

In front of me was a rather appealing single-storey brick structure punctuated by a series of arched entries, on top of which commuter trains shuttled backwards and forwards. In their day the archways would have provided access to all manner of goods stored within the vaults. Given Hibiya’s location between Marunouchi and Ginza, the location was strategic. However, in today’s economy of high-tech warehousing I did not have to wait long for an answer to my question of how the vaults had been repurposed.

As dusk descended the scene transitioned. More people appeared from both directions, not surprising really when one considers that Marunouchi and Ginza are each large employment hubs. As well as increased pedestrian traffic, the activity around the vaults grew. Neon signs lit up, internal lighting revealed the innards of the vaults, advertising signs adorned the pavements and it became clear that the old storage vaults had become a restaurant strip. The location is thus still strategic with a location between two large employment hubs serving the love of Japanese workers for a meal and/or a drink at the end of a working day.

Accidental finds are always the most enjoyable when travelling and in this instance, where to have dinner became an easy decision.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)