johnliddlephotography

Frozen moments from the infinity that is time

Everyday Tokyo

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This is my hundredth post on Japan, thus bringing this series to an end, at least until I can return to build a larger image stock. I am, however, intending to finish the year with a couple of posts based on specific individual images to ease my withdrawal symptoms. The images I have shared over this journey were taken during two separate six-week visits during the Japanese Autumn and Spring seasons, with the approach evolving as I went. From my perspective I have enjoyed the experience, which allowed me to stay in touch with Japan and to gain enhanced knowledge through comments made on photographs from time to time.

Whilst this is really a low-key finale I thought it fitting to finish with a few street shots of everyday life from the world’s most populated metropolis. The opening image (pic 1) was clearly shot in the Ginza where upmarket brands compete for attention and seem to be regarded as commonplace by local Tokyoites. Of course, I’m sure the subliminal messaging is still working. From the Ginza to the older Tokyo vibe of Asakusa (pic 2) is a big change, but kids are kids and I thought the teacher (my assumption) setting-up for a group shot to remember the outing was quite universal in its nature.

Pics 3 and 4 taken on a Sunday visit to Ueno Park are reminders of the contrasts to be found in all societies. Whilst the bike-riding drummer (pic 3) attracted a crowd, almost directly across the pathway was the homeless person (pic 4) alone with her thoughts. During my times in Tokyo I visited Ebisu often for the convenience of shopping (pic 5), as well as being a frequent visitor to Tokyo’s wonderful Museum of Photography (pic 6).

I’ve included three shots from Hibiya (pics 7 to 9) as I believe the area highlights two commendable characteristics of Tokyo life. For an area that in many other cities around the world might tend towards seediness, the pictures demonstrate the typical cleanliness of the streets and the high level of public safety.

This brings me to the final shot taken in Roppongi. Compared to the ordered chaos of the famous Shibuya crossing, the street crossing in Roppongi (pic 10) is humdrum. Nevertheless, I found it an interesting example of proxemic behaviour where those waiting to cross have each taken up positions that maximises their personal space. The classic example of such behaviour is most easily observed in elevators. Be observant next time you ride a lift.

Thank you to everyone who has visited my blog, with an especial thanks to those who have been regular visitors since the early stages of this series.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)

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This gallery contains 10 photos


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Ginza (part 1)

The young woman (pic 1) exiting Ginza Station is about to emerge at the famous Ginza Crossing, the heart of Ginza and probably the most expensive real estate in Tokyo.

In English, Ginza translates to silver mint and was indeed the location for a silver-coin mint built in 1612. At that time the area was vastly different from today with its traditional wooden buildings and narrow streets. Two events impacted significantly on its transformation, namely the enlightenment of the Meiji Restoration period and the great fire of 1872. Decisions to adopt brick and stone as building materials and the widening of Chuo-dori from 15 to 27 metres, thus created Tokyo’s first boulevard and provided the foundation for the nation’s entrepreneurs to create the Ginza we know today.

Ginza Crossing or, to be more correct, the Ginza 4-chome intersection, is the area’s hub. On one corner is the San-ai building (pics 2 and 3), a tubular glass building housing a variety of businesses, as well as prominent advertising signage. Le Café Doutor occupies the first two levels, with the upper level being an excellent vantage point for people watching over coffee. Unfortunately, the best seats are in the smoking area, so I have not had the pleasure of lingering there to enjoy the view.

The WAKO Department Store with its famous Seiko clock atop the building dominates another corner. This is perhaps the most recognised of the Crossing’s corners (pics 4 and 5) and WAKO has enjoyed loyal patronage since its inception in 1868.

Diagonally opposite WAKO on the third corner is the Nissan Gallery (pic 6), a somewhat unusual yet interesting space where one can peruse displays of Nissan’s latest vehicles. Nissan’s head office is also located in Ginza, thus reminding us that the area is a business centre and not just a retail and entertainment hub.

The fourth corner is occupied by the Mitsukoshi Department Store, which I understand is the oldest of Japan’s major department stores and the starting point for the Mitsui Group, which operates globally across a range of diverse industries. During my visits to Japan I formed a liking for Mitsukoshi over the other major stores and it is somewhat embarrassing not to have a photograph to round out the four corners. It’s on the list for next time.

If one was to include the word Ginza in a word association test, one suspects a frequent response would be “shopping” or similar terms. There is no question that it deserves its place among the world’s great shopping and entertainment precincts, as can be appreciated from the brand names at pics 9 to 21. This is not an exhaustive coverage, but suffices to demonstrate the esteem in which Ginza is held among the world’s top designers and popular global brands.

One of my favourite photos is pic 7, where two generations under the protective cover of their brollies pass on the sidewalk. Each group seems immersed in their own conversations, though I find it amusing that the older ladies have the more colourful brollies.

In this post I have focused on showing glimpses of the well-known Ginza and without the stores depicted here, there would be no Ginza as we popularly think of it. However, there is more than glitz and glitter to Ginza and in my next post I will share some images taken around the area’s quieter streets.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)