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Frozen moments from the infinity that is time


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Arashiyama (Kyoto)

It is said that “word of mouth” is the best advertising and I suspect that Arashiyama benefits from this form of advertising. If you are a first-time visitor to Kyoto and seek advice from others of where to go, there is a very good chance that Arashiyama will be recommended. That was my experience and now when I am asked I always recommend visiting Arashiyama.

Why is this so? Well, rather than complicate the answer, my view is that Arashiyama is simply a pleasant, relaxing and interesting place to visit. One can enjoy beautiful natural scenery, visit spectacular temples, stroll through beautiful gardens, watch life go by from cafes and restaurants and meander through Arashiyama’s laneways. Most visitors seem to do most, if not all of these activities.

There is, of course, major attractions for which Arashiyama is well known such as Tenryu-ji, the bamboo grove and the gardens of Ohkochi-Sanso Villa. Each has been covered in earlier blogs and there is no reason to revisit them here. Instead, this post shows glimpses of everyday life that one may encounter during a visit. With the exception of the Togetsukyo Bridge, a prominent local landmark, the images shown are quite nondescript. This is not unlike life, which, if captured photographically would be replayed as many nondescript images punctuated by occasional highlights. Rather than celebrate the highlights, I hope this post may demonstrate that there is much to celebrate within the nondescript moments of our daily lives.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)

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Ohkochi-Sanso Villa (Kyoto)

Is 1000 yen too expensive to visit a beautiful garden on the slopes of Mount Ogura with glorious views over Kyoto? Compared to (say) temple entry fees, a visit to Ohkochi-Sanso Villa is more costly, but it is money well spent. It is a garden built for the four seasons and after visiting during the Autumn, my travel journal record read, in part: “I can only say it is the most beautiful garden I have ever seen.”

Located in Arashiyama the villa is easily accessible and is, in my opinion, another of Arashiyama’s gems. Being close to the magnificent Tenryu-ji, combining the two locations is an ideal way to spend a day in Kyoto. In fact, exiting Tenryu-ji and turning left along Arashiyama’s famous bamboo grove will bring you to Ohkochi-Sanso Villa within a few minutes walk.

The villa was opened to the public following the death of the famous silent movie actor Denjiro Okochi in 1962, which, during his life, had been a second home for the actor. Covering approximately 20,000 square metres, the estate was a labour of love, taking about thirty years to create and hone to his liking.

My personal memory is of a sublime space where one eagerly followed every path and where every boulder was perfectly placed. This is not to suggest, however, that the garden is clinical. Whilst it is traditionally Japanese, it is not manicured to perfection in the manner of karesansui style gardens. In Okochi’s garden, everything simply seems to be in the right place and discrete spaces seamlessly join. Quiet places well suited to meditation and relaxation are to be found, as are little meadows and open spaces where children can frolic. It is a garden built for the four seasons and to be lived in and enjoyed.

Spending time here is a pleasant experience that continues in the tearoom prior to leaving. Entry includes a souvenir postcard and green tea served with a seasonal sweet in the tearoom where one could view maples or bamboo depending where one sat. To return to the opening question, 1000 yen is money well spent!

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)


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Sayonara Sakura (Kyoto)

Sayonara Sakura is my fourth and final post on the cherry blossom season and I hope readers of this blog have enjoyed the images as much as I have enjoyed sharing them.

Once captured, an image is forever and becomes one of those frozen moments from the infinity that is time. This has allowed me the indulgence of posting cherry blossom themed photographs over four weeks, somewhat longer than the real-life experience.

To conclude this series I have selected photographs linked only by the common factor of cherry blossom. Some photos are personal favourites, whereas others revisit and extend previous themes. Allow me to make a few brief observations on select photos.

All the photos were taken in and around Kyoto, with the first photograph showing the Philosopher’s Path – a walk I made many times and a favourite place of mine in Kyoto. This photo best captures the image of the Path that I carry in my mind.

In an earlier post (March 28, 2014) I featured a number of shots taken at the Heian shrine, where the cherry blossom was simply magnificent. I had reluctantly excluded pics 3 and 4 from that post – an exclusion now remedied.

Pics 8 and 9 should be viewed together in that they show diners at different ends of the culinary spectrum, each enjoying views of nearby cherry blossom whilst dining. On the one hand there is the clean, modern lines of a fast-food establishment (pic 8) and on the other (pic 9), a row of high-end teahouses, which I have seen attended by geisha. Two polar dining experiences linked by the sakura.

Another favourite location is Ryoanji and particularly its highly renowned karesansui within a magnificent earthen wall. At pic 13 I have shown the sakura from the other side of the wall – a personal indulgence.

Those who have visited Kyoto will probably have visited the Kiyomizudera Temple in Kyoto’s Gion district. Pics 14 and 15 feature the same sakura tree at the top of the steps near the main entrance. Pic 14 is the view that greets visitors on arrival and pic 15 is the reverse view looking out over Kyoto and its surrounding hills.

I recall an earlier visit to Kyoto where I chose to capture the sunset from Kiyomizudera as my final shots of Kyoto. Somehow the final photograph of this blog seems an appropriate way to bid sayonara to the sakura until next year.

(Please click on any of the following images for an enlarged view.)